Thailand is usually known for its calm, picturesque beaches and relaxing nature landscapes. But if you need a little more of an adrenaline rush than lounging around on the sand, this Southeast Asian gem has a countless adventure and sporting spots to offer you.

Go Free Diving in Koh Tao

Scuba diving might seem extreme enough, but if you really want to explore your limits, you can try your hand at free diving, which is basically diving without an oxygen tank. Instead, you rely on a single breath of air and dive for a few minutes, down to 20 or more metres. Sound too much? The key to a successful free dive is to relax and control your breath underwater. Two Wandering Soles outlines how to scout the best diving schools in Koh Tao Island to ensure you get the best and safest experience. You’ll be treated to a view of surreal shipwrecks, marine life, and coral reefs.

Credit: Adventure in You

Summit the Doi Luang Peak

Doi Luang, Chiang Mai
Opening Season: 1 Nov – 31 March

Thailand has so many majestic mountains. But if you’re looking for a peak with the most romantic view, Doi Luang is your best bet. The mountain stands 2225 metres from sea level and is 15 kilometres in length. It’s a relatively easy hike, and you might get the chance to spot some endangered species exclusive to this Thailand jungle.

Credit: Asian Itinerary

Play Sepak Takraw

You might never have heard of Sepak Takraw before, but it’s one of Southeast Asia’s most popular sports. Ladbrokes explains that it’s a variation on volleyball, which you have to use your feet instead of your hands. This is why its name literally translates to “Kick Ball.” It also combines a bit of gymnastics, kung fu, and even circus acrobatics. Even if you don’t get to play it, it’s still an exhilarating sight to witness. Best place to see it and participate in a pick up game is at the Lumphini Park in Bangkok, near the Sala Daeng sky train station.

Credit: The Nation

Go zip-lining at Chiang Mai’s Flight of the Gibbon

This globally renowned outdoor activity spans more than six kilometres among the towering trees of an ancient forest. It attracts tourists from around the world and is definitely worth adding to your outdoor bucket list. If you’re lucky, travel blog Together to Wherever notes you might catch sight of the elusive rare Gibbon itself, along with some other rare animals as you zip through the stunning landscape.

Go Deep Water Soloing in Tonsai or Railay

Typically described as rock climbing on steroids, deep water soloing is not for the faint of heart. According to writer Matthew Karsten, there are many areas of the world where the sport is quite popular, but the islands around Railay Beach in Southern Thailand are some of the best. This form of free-climbing involves bouldering and scaling cliffs without harnesses, ropes, anchor points, or climbing gear whatsoever. Just you, the rock, and the water. There’s no other way up but to make the climb and going down means leaping from the edge when your body can no longer take you higher. It can be 10 feet or 100 feet — whatever you’re comfortable with.

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